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Children enjoy spinning and playing with dreidels during Hanukkah. Dreidels are inscribed with four Hebrew letters that stand for "a great miracle happened there", bringing our attention to Hanukkah's great miracles. Contemporary Judaica artists have turned this traditional dreidel game into a work of art.
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Hanukkah Dreidel by Iris Design Hanukkah Dreidel by Iris Design Dreidel by Adi Sidler Dreidel by Adi Sidler
Double Spiral Dreidel - Blue by Adi Sidler
List Price:$59.00
Price:$49.95
Hanukkah Dreidel by Iris Design Hanukkah Dreidel by Iris Design Dreidel by Adi Sidler Dreidel by Adi Sidler
Coil Dreidel- Gold by Adi Sidler
List Price:$45.00
Price:$34.95
Coil Dreidel - Purple by Adi Sidler
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Price:$34.95
Dreidel by Adi Sidler Dreidel by Adi Sidler Dreidel by Adi Sidler Dreidel by Adi Sidler
Coil Dreidel - Silver by Adi Sidler
List Price:$45.00
Price:$34.95
Coil Dreidel - Blue by Adi Sidler
List Price:$45.00
Price:$34.95
Double Spiral Dreidel by Adi Sidler
List Price:$59.00
Price:$49.95
Double Flower Dreidels by Adi Sidler
List Price:$59.00
Price:$49.95
Dreidel by Adi Sidler Dreidel by Adi Sidler Hand Painted Wooden Dreidel - Jerusalem Hand Painted Dreidel - Jerusalem In Blue
Double Flower Dreidels by Adi Sidler
List Price:$59.00
Price:$49.95
Double Flower Dreidels by Adi Sidler
List Price:$59.00
Price:$49.95
Hanukkah Dreidel by Iris Design Hanukkah Dreidel by Iris Design Hanukkah Dreidel by Iris Design Hanukkah Dreidel by Iris Design
Rainbow Dreidel by Caesarea Arts Rainbow Dreidel by Caesarea Arts Rainbow Dreidel by Caesarea Arts Dreidel by Caesarea Arts
Jade Dreidel by Caesarea Arts Dreidel, Round Cornelian by Caesarea Arts
   
 
Dreidel

A dreidel is a four sided spinning top; it is played with on the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah.
Every side of the dreidel contains a Hebrew letter:  (Nun), (Gimel), (Hei), (Shin), that when put together form the acronym for Nes Gadol Hayah Sham (A great miracle happened there), pertaining to the miracle that happened in the land of Israel. In Israel, peh replaces the fourth letter shin. The letters as well forms a reminder for the rules of a game of chance played with a dreidel: Nun represents the Yiddish word nicht ("nothing"), Hei corresponds halb ("half"), Gimmel for gants ("all"), and Shin for shtel Ayn ("put in"). In Israel, the letter (Pei) is inscribed on the fourth side of most Dreidels. A few stores in Haredi neighborhoods sell the Dreidels.
Playing with the dreidel is a custom Hanukkah game played in Jewish households around the globe, but rules may change.

A game akin to the dreidel game was well-known at the time of the Antiochus rule. At this era, Jews were not allowed to openly practice their faith, so when they gathered together to learn the Torah they would bring a dreidel with them. Whenever soldiers came along, they would promptly conceal what they were studying and pretended to be playing a game of chance with the dreidel.

Rules in playing the Dreidel:
Any amount of people is allowed to play the dreidel game. At the start of the game every player is given an equal number of candy or gelt pieces, usually around ten to fifteen.
At the start of every round, all player places one piece into the center "pot." They then spin the dreidel alternately, with the following meanings assigned to every Hebrew letter on the Dreidel:
If the dreidel stops with a nun on top, the spinner will do nothing.  In Yiddish, Nun means nichts (nothing).
If the dreidel stops with the Gimmel on top, the spinner will get everything in the pot. In Yiddish, Gimmel means ganz (everything).
If the dreidel stops with a hey on top, the spinner will get half of the pot. In Yiddish, Hey means halb (half).
If the dreidel stops with either a Pey or a shin on top, the player puts in another game piece on the pot. In Yiddish, Shin means shtel (put in) or Pey (pay).

Once a player has no more game pieces they are out.

The custom Hannukah dreidel is a throwback to the times when the Greek armies of King Antiochus controlled the Holy Land, prior to being defeated by the Maccabees. The influential government authorized a series of laws illegalizing the study of Torah and a lot of the mitzvoth. The Jews were obliged to take their study on the Torah “undercover,” because they acknowledged that a Jew without Torah is like a fish without water.
Jewish children fell back to studying the Torah in far areas and woodlands. Even this plan was not foolproof, for the foe had a lot of guards. The children therefore brought small Dreidels that they would rapidly bring out and play with after hiding away their texts, so that they could make-believe to be just playing games.