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Judaica Artists


Here you can find a wide selection of originally designed gifts by Israeli Judaica artists. Our exclusive collection includes unique Judaica items that make great gifts on all Jewish occasions, including Hanukkah menorahs, Seder plates, Shabbat candlesticks and more. We at Canaan-Online are always in the search for new and intriguing Judaica artists who trigger our imagination.
City of David Jewelry Kakadu - art in wood Michal Ben Yosef Yealat Chen
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HaAri Jewelry Yair Emanuel Ester Shahaf Adina Plastelina
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Anat Basanta David Gerstein Itay Mager Golan jewelry
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Shraga Landesman Gabrieli Tallit Jack Jaget Laura Cowan
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Nano jewelry Agayof Ori Iris Shemesh
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Orly Zeelon Caesarea Arts Benny Dabach Adi Sidler
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Dorit Klein Amaro jewelry Shahar Peleg Orna Lalo
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Tzuki Art
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hamsa necklace 100 Kisses Sculpture by David Gerstein Shema Yisrael wall decor by Dorit Klein Mezuzah case Agayof
Oriental Hamsa Necklace by Amaro Jewelry
List Price:$99.00
Price:$74.95
100 Kisses Sculpture by David Gerstein
List Price:$199.00
Price:$179.00
Shema Yisrael wall decor by Dorit Judaica
Price:$89.00
Sale Price:$79.00
Aluminum Mezuzah Case by Anat Basanta Zodiac Pendant Capricorn FACE TO FACE - Sculpture by David Gerstein Heart Necklace by Ester Shahaf
FACE TO FACE - Sculpture by David Gerstein
List Price:$129.00
Price:$109.00
   
 
Current Judaica artists turn traditional religious articles, such as Hanukkah menorah and jewelry pieces, into an artistic expression of faith.

Contemporary Judaica Artists
The last two decades have shown a growing popularity of Judaica artworks. A short research also reveals that many of the best Judaica artists in the field live and work in Israel. What characterizes the work of contemporary Judaica artists?

Judaica art has become a center of gravitation for Judaica artists drawn to the mysterious world of Judaism.
Judaica artists combines ancient Jewish symbols with modern styles
Contemporary Judaica artists skillfully deliver more than 2000 years old Jewish heritage with a modern interpretation, while adding a twist of their own world view and imagination. Thus, the arists have created a wide array of Judaica gifts that enjoy a world wide popularity - now more than ever as the internet makes everything more accessible.

Supported by growing  global   demand, today's Judaica artists express more and more freedom in their artworks.
Judaica artists recreate these traditionas objects through a contemporary process, giving it a modern perspective. Unlike in previous eras, contemporary Judaica artists offer bold and interpretations of religious symbols that never cease to surprise.

Through their artworks, Judaica artists seem to claim that even in our secular modern society, religion in general and Judaism in particular is still relevant . Not only relevant but still alive and kicking.

This unusual and fascinating combination of elements might explain the growing popularity of Judaica art in the last few years. Many Judaica artworks clearly reflect the ongoing changes in the modern Jewish society. Today many Judaica artists give expression to feminism: today you can easily find handmade Tallits that are designed for women.

Israeli Judaica artists
In Israel, Judaica art provides a much needed space for diverse cultural influences. As you can see in various examples, Israeli Judaica artists often bring together western and oriental motifs.  Israeli Judaica artists are inspired by both Israeli and Jewish symbolism and that's what makes their work so unique and easy to recognize. You're invited to take a closer look at the works of renowned Israeli Judaica artists such as Ester Shahaf, Yair Emanuel and Tzuki Art.

 Esther Shahaf, an Israeli Judaica designer, is a great example of how different and sometimes conflicting elements intertwine harmoniously in Israeli Judaica. In Shahaf's works, oriental influences such as the Hamsa hand gracefully complement the Western motifs.

Israeli Judaica artists also draw their inspiration from the everyday surroundings such as the landscape of Jerusalem. Among Israeli Judaica designs you can find mezuzah cases and other objects directly inspired by The \Wailing Wall, a prominent motif that describes the mourning of the second temple that was destroyed more than two thousand years ago.